Training & Consultancy

IFHHRO engages health workers in the realization of health-related human rights.

The right to health provides health workers with useful tools for promoting and protecting the rights and well-being of patients, as well as their own human rights. It is this message that IFHHRO wants to spread through the training of health workers in a rights-based approach to health, and by providing information and building networks through which health workers will be mobilized to protect and promote the right to health in their daily work.

We have a vast expertise in training health workers. By using participatory methods we train health workers to use a human rights-based approach to health in their own work. We can help your organisation or group too. Please contact us if you are in need of training and we will try to find a trainer for you. We can also find you a consultant on health and human rights. These services cannot be offered for free as we currently do not have a budget for this. But the costs will be relatively low as we do not have a commercial purpose. 

If you would like to conduct your own training on health and human rights or the right to health, please consider using our well-evaluated online training module.

 

Archive of IFHHRO training and networking meetings

Latest News

  • Health professionals unethical involvement in CIA torture programme

    complicityAccording to a new report released today by Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), recently declassified documents confirm that the CIA conducted experimental research to test an unsupported hypothesis that torture could break the resistance of detainees and aid interrogation. It confirms that health workers were involved in illegal and unethical experiments to define the thresholds of pain and suffering of the torture subjects.

     
  • USA: Drug courts fail to provide adequeate treatment to drug users

    drugaddictionIn the report Neither Justice nor Treatment, Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) states that drug courts in the United States struggle to meet medical and human rights standards. According to the researchers, drug courts – designed to reduce incarceration and provide necessary treatment – routinely fail to provide adequate, medically-sound treatment for substance use disorders.