Online Training Manual

The Human Rights for Health Workers - IFHHRO Training Manual shares materials developed to train health workers in health and human  rights issues. It intends to bridge the gap between the legal conceptualization of the right to health and the daily practice of health workers by providing human rights education materials specifically designed for health workers.

Human rights education is generally not integrated in medical and nursing school curricula and most health workers have limited knowledge about human rights. When introducing health workers to human rights it is extremely important not to overwhelm them with only legal information. This is why the relation between health-related human rights and the daily work of a health worker plays a central role in most of the session plans provided in this online manual.

Health workers do not need to become human rights specialists, but having basic knowledge does matter. In their daily work health workers need to take decisions that can mean the difference between the protection or violation of human rights. What exactly health workers need to learn depends on the country they work in, their specialisation and their knowledge about human rights. There is therefore no fixed format for a human rights training programme for health workers. Experience learns that it is possible to interest health workers in human rights as long as they can establish a connection with their own work. An effective way to do this is by using a participatory training approach based on the principles of adult learning in which recognizable situations are used as a starting point to stimulate new insights.

It is this way of thinking that forms the basis for all the session plans available on this website. All session plans have been tried out during IFHHRO trainings. Some session plans are suitable for all trainings, others need to be adapted to the local situation, the learning objectives, or the target group.

This online manual consists of 7 basic parts:

  1. Planning a training: tips for training health workers
  2. Opening sessions: suggestions for the introduction of the participants and the programme
  3. Introducing health and human rights: essential basic information
  4. Elements of a rights-based approach: the different elements of a RBA approach to health
  5. Health issues and human rights: different health issues in relation to human rights
  6. Human rights mechanisms: actions to protect health-related human rights
  7. Further sessions: relevant sessions that do not fit in one of the above categories

All sessions are structured in the same way and consist of the following components:

  • Learning objectives: explains what participants should have learned at the end of the session
  • Target group: identifies the type of group for which the session is appropriate
  • Duration: gives the recommended duration of the session
  • Training materials: gives a list of stationery and supplies needed during the session
  • Training aids: lists any supporting tool(s) that are provided at the end of the session plan
  • Handouts: lists documents to distribute also provided at the end of the session plan
  • Session plan: a step by step guide for training delivery including indication of time

Human Rights for Health Workers - an IFHHRO Online Training Manual

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