Campaigning & Advocacy

To safeguard clinical independence and promote protection mechanisms for health workers, IFHHRO engages continuously in active dialogues with organisations such as the WMA, ICN and WHO.
We advocate for increased attention to the role and responsibilities of health workers in implementing the right to health.

Stop Torture in Health Care Campaign

From 2010 to 2012, IFHHRO collaborated with Open Society Foundations and other NGO partners in the campaign Stop Torture in Health Care, an initiative to stop cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment in health-care settings. In the framework of this campaign, IFHHRO focused on three issues:

  1. Pain management as a human right
  2. Forced and/or coerced sterilization
  3. Detention in stead of treatment

For each of these topics IFHHRO organised conferences and workshops with organisations of health professionals and human rights experts. We can safely state that the campaign's three topics of attention are now well on the agenda of leading medical and human rights organisations. IFHHRO's collaboration with the World Medical Association (WMA), several National Medical Associations (NMAs) and the International Council of Nurses has thus proven successful. Especially the adoption of the WMA Resolution on Access to Adequate Pain Treatment has been a big success. It illustrates the necessity of cooperation between organisations of health professionals and human rights organisations.

IFHHRO highlights from this campaign

Latest News

  • Adolescents' access to sexual and reproductive health and rights

    mum babyA new publication of the Centre for Reproductive Rights analyses young people's access to sexual and reproductive health from a human rights perspective. It concludes that significant gaps remain in adolescents' knowledge about their sexual and reproductive health and rights and ability to access essential sexual and reproductive health services.

     
  • Brazil: Gaps in response to Zika virus outbreak

    mum babyIn a recent Human Rights Watch report, the organization states that Brazil has not addressed longstanding human rights problems that allowed the Zika virus outbreak to escalate. As a result, the Zika threat in Brazil remains, even though the government declared an end to the national public health emergency related to the Zika virus in May 2017.