Voices in the Field: new interview series

ifhhroVoices in the Field is a new multimedia interview series that shares the stories of experienced professionals in the field of health and highlights the role of human rights in their careers. Voices in the Field, a project of Global Health Law Groningen (The Netherlands) and IFHHRO, aims to capture the accounts of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including professors, lawyers, doctors, nurses, researchers and policymakers.

The knowledge these professionals have accumulated over the course of their careers can be used to better our understanding of the many ways health practices can interact (and at times be found to conflict) with human rights.

The first two interviews are with Prof. Henriette Roscam Abbing and Prof. Hans Hogerzeil. Roscam Abbing is former Professor of Health Law, and current chair of the European Association of Health Law, editor for the Dutch Journal on Health Law and the European Journal of Health Law, and a member of the Dutch Health Council. Hogerzeil is a Professor at the Faculty of Medical Sciences of the University of Groningen and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh.


Go to Voices in the Field

Latest News

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