Health systems and human rights

conferenceFrom 9 to 14 November, the World Bank Institute will organise a global symposium on health systems and the right to health in Salzburg, Austria.

Entitled 'Realizing the Right to Health: How can a rights-based approach best contribute to the strengthening, sustainability and equity of access to medicines and health systems?', the meeting will be highty participatory.

Specific topics will include:

  • Access to medicines
  • The potential of IT to overcome major challenges, including assessing levels and distribution of access to medicines and health care.
  • The use of information collaboratively with physicians in shared medical decision-making, ensuring respect for patient preferences in diverse contexts.
  • Better alignment of health care provision with true demand for services through better measurement of wants and needs.
  • The role of strategic litigation and judicial decisions in seeking redress in health policy.

Participants will include diverse stakeholders, including health policy practitioners, development practitioners, human rights experts, members of the judiciary, representatives of the pharmaceutical industry, representatives of civil society and patients' organizations, IT community members, physicians, and academics.

More information

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