Strategies

The International Federation of Health and Human Rights Organisations includes organisations of different sizes and profiles, and unites these organisations based on the allegiance of the right-based approach to health, the urgent need of mobilization of health professionals for human rights, and mutual support in the face of threats to health professionals who advocate health-related human rights. 

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a rights-based approach to health means “integrating human rights norms and principles in the design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of health-related policies and programmes.” IFHHRO promotes a rights-based approach to health as a strategy for structural improvement of the health situation of vulnerable groups. Such an approach addresses social factors of inequalities in health, the responsibility of governments to reduce these inequalities, and the legitimate claim of health consumers and providers for a better health system.

In order to fulfill our mission of mobilizing health workers for the worldwide progressive realisation of health-related human rights, we have identified the following strategies:

  1. Promoting a rights-based approach to health
  2. Policy influencing, mainly through the drafting of policy statements
  3. Promotion of human rights education for medical students and health professionals

Latest News

  • Adolescents' access to sexual and reproductive health and rights

    mum babyA new publication of the Centre for Reproductive Rights analyses young people's access to sexual and reproductive health from a human rights perspective. It concludes that significant gaps remain in adolescents' knowledge about their sexual and reproductive health and rights and ability to access essential sexual and reproductive health services.

     
  • Brazil: Gaps in response to Zika virus outbreak

    mum babyIn a recent Human Rights Watch report, the organization states that Brazil has not addressed longstanding human rights problems that allowed the Zika virus outbreak to escalate. As a result, the Zika threat in Brazil remains, even though the government declared an end to the national public health emergency related to the Zika virus in May 2017.