The British Medical Association (BMA)

General Information
The BMA is the doctors’ professional organisation established to look after the professional and personal needs of our members. The BMA represents doctors in all branches of medicine all over the UK.

We are a voluntary association with over two-thirds of practising UK doctors in membership and an independent trade union dedicated to protecting individual members and the collective interests of doctors.

We are the voice for doctors and medical students – in constant contact with ministers, government departments, members of the UK, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland administrations and many other influential bodies. We are committed to keeping members in touch with the profession’s collective views and policies and to being at the forefront of healthcare development.

We promote the medical and allied sciences, seek to maintain the honour and interests of the medical profession and promote the achievement of high quality healthcare. Our policies cover public health issues, medical ethics, science, the state of the NHS, medical education and doctors’ contracts.

Policies are decided by elected members, mainly practising doctors and supported by a professional staff who work with other bodies to meet its objectives.

Contact Information 
Address BMA Head Office: BMA House, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9JP
Telephone: +44 020 7387 4499

Website
www.bma.org.uk

Latest News

  • Unfulfilled healthcare needs of migrant women care workers

    careOn November 21, a high-level panel at a meeting convened in Geneva will discuss a new WHO report entitled "Women on the Move: Migration, care work and health". Available data shows that a substantial and growing proportion of care work is being undertaken by migrants, the majority of whom are women. In Italy for instance, nearly 90% of home-based caregivers are foreign born. In this report, the World Health Organization (WHO) calls attention "to a global situation in which migrant women care workers buttress health systems in countries where there are shortfalls in healthcare provision, while their own right to health is eroded and their health care needs go unfulfilled." 

     
  • Why is adolescents’ health a human rights issue?

    ifhhroAdolescents face a myriad of threats to their right to health including violence, sexual assault, exploitation, trafficking, and harmful traditional practices. At the same time, they face multiple barriers to health services, including restrictive laws, unavailability of contraception or safe abortions; failure to ensure privacy and confidentiality; judgemental service provision, and discrimination. Our volunteer Tara Ornstein wrote an article about adolescents’ right to health for our website, explaining what the issues are and what health professionals can do to safeguard adolescents’ health and rights.